Women in Ministry: A Hermeneutical and Historical Approach Part 10

In 1968, American Baptists released a report that very few women were part of its national staff—the women in upper-level positions actually decreased between 1958 and 1968. United Methodist Church found less than one percent of its active ordained ministers were women. In the 1970s, a vast number of literature emerged on sexism in the …

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Women in Ministry: A Hermeneutical and Historical Approach Part 9

As women began to realize that they were not given representation on mission’s boards, women began to take the initiative and form their own boards by the early 1860s. By the end of the nineteenth century, most denominations had debated whether or not to allow women preachers and the related role of ordination. Many denominations …

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Women in Ministry: A Hermeneutical and Historical Approach Part 8

Yesterday, we left off with stating that although women were beginning to be shunned from ministry opportunities in the first two centuries A.D., they still shared in the same sufferings of persecution as men. Being shunned from ministry opportunities was the least of women's worries. In the middle ages, the witch craze spread across Europe yet …

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Women in Ministry: A Hermeneutical and Historical Approach Part 7

It is no secret that Jesus broke many Jewish customs. One of which was to encourage female followers. This fact is of extraordinary significance. In Judaism, women were exempt from learning the Torah. They might learn a great deal informally, as they did through synagogue teaching, but a woman would not on her own enter …

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Women in Ministry: A Hermeneutical and Historical Approach Part 6

Last week, we began a new series on women in ministry and took a closer look at the controversial writings of the Apostle Paul. Examples of Paul accepting women in ministry are seen by the company he kept. “His letters reveal that women were active with him in [his] mission.”[1] In the book of Romans, …

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Women in Ministry: A Hermeneutical and Historical Approach Part 5

Yesterday, we left off with discussing the proper hermeneutical interpretations of some of Paul's controversial passages. Paul in 1 Tim. 2:8-9 is correcting specific issues with the Ephesian church—one prevalent with males (lifting hands—free from anger and controversy), the other prevalent with females (a modest appearance). The more controversial verse, however, is verse 11: that …

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Women in Ministry: A Hermeneutical and Historical Approach Part 4

Yesterday, we left off with the question, 'why are women allowed to prophecy and hold such a high position yet in chapter 14, verses 34 and 35 are called to keep silent?' The answer is simple. Paul, “is simply correcting a specific disruption situation that is evidently present and problematic in the church,” [1] that …

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